Peabody Hall, Room 115
Special Information:
For upcoming events with this workshop see the attached brochure

Religion Courses, Self-Authorship, and the Pursuit of the Common Good”

This workshop begins with a history of American higher education’s view of student ethical development, including the current concern for how students develop a sense of their identity.  Of particular interest is the way that students develop an understanding of how they will contribute to the common good in a pluralistic culture.  Foster and Patterson explore how exposure to diverse religious traditions provides an excellent basis for students to appreciate their own ethical identities as they come to appreciate the best ethical teachings and practices of world religions.  This seminar helps students consider the potential ethical value of religion courses while inviting faculty, staff, and the public to reflect on the broader purposes of American higher education in its contemporary form. 

The Final Lecture in this series will be:

“Is It Good to Be Religious on the Public University Campus?”  Logo

Join us for this panel discussion where students from different backgrounds discuss their religious/non-religious/spiritual experiences at UGA.  Discussion will focus on how different groups interact and the opportunities and challenges students face navigating their own religious identity, as well as the religious diversity across the campus.  How do students engage the religious diversity across campus in a way that promotes mutual learning, growth, safety and inclusion?  What role does the public university play to facilitate these experiences while remaining neutral?  How can students initiate activities for interfaith engagement?  Hannah Trawick of the Interfaith Youth Core (IFYC) will facilitate this panel discussion.  IFYC is a national non-profit organization working towards an America where people of different faiths, worldviews, and traditions can bridge differences and find common values to build a shared life together